bergen city museum the museums | the leprosy museum

The Leprosy Museum

 

The Norwegian history of leprosy is part of the worldwide history of an illness that on account of its heavy stigma resulted in the exclusion and humiliation of millions of people. Between 1850 and 1900 Bergen was an international capital of leprosy, with three leprosy hospitals and the largest concentration of patients in Europe.
 

The city’s oldest leprosy hospital, St. George’s Hospital, is now not only a monument to thousands of personal tragedies, it is also an important arena for the dissemination of Norwegian work and research on leprosy. In many parts of the world leprosy is commonly known as Hansen’s disease, named after the Norwegian physician Armauer Hansen who discovered the leprosy bacillus in Bergen in 1873. The last patient at St. George’s Hospital died in 1946.
 

The leprosy archives in Bergen are part of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Programme.
 

 

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	In the old hospital for leprosy patients, Norway's famous history of leprosy is disseminated.

In the old hospital for leprosy patients, Norway's famous history of leprosy is disseminated.

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	St. George's is proably Northern Europe's best preserved leprosy hospital.

St. George's is proably Northern Europe's best preserved leprosy hospital.

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	G. H. Armauer Hansen (1841-1912), the discoverer of the leprosy bacillus.

G. H. Armauer Hansen (1841-1912), the discoverer of the leprosy bacillus.

Contact:

Telephone:481 62 678
Address:Kong Oscars gate 59
Postboks 4052
5835 Bergen
lepramuseet@bymuseet.no

Opening hours


No regular opening hours during the winter season. Next season starts May 15th 2016.


Entrance fee 2016:


Adults: NOK 80


Students: NOK 40


Children free admittance


Guided tour NOK 20


Half price when visiting other Bergen City Museum arenas. Separate prices at events.


 

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